April 17, 2017

Providing for privacy in a network infrastructure protection context

Machine Learning and Big Data Analysis are seen as the silver bullet to detect and counteract attacks on critical communication infrastructure. Every message is analysed and is to some degree under suspicion. The principle of innocent until proven guilty does not seem to apply to modern communication usage. On the other hand, criminals would gain easily upper hand in communication networks that are not protected and on the outlook for attacks. This poses quite a problem for the technical implementation and handling of network communication traffic. How can a communication network provider protect user data against malicious activities without screening and data analysis and loss of the human right of privacy? This article provides a classification system for data usage, privacy sensitivity and risk through which we will illustrate on a concrete example how to provide user privacy, while still enabling protection.

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Recent Publications

May 22, 2017

Multidimensional Resource Allocation in NFV Cloud

  • Goldstein M.
  • Raz D.
  • Segall I.

Network Function Virtualization (NFV) is a new networking paradigm in which network functionality is implemented on top of virtual infrastructure deployed over COTS servers. One of the main motivations for the shift of telco operators into this paradigm is cost reduction, thus the efficient use of resources is an important ...

May 20, 2017

The Actual Cost of Software Switching for NFV Chaining

  • Caggiani Luizelli M.
  • Raz D.
  • Saar Y.
  • Yallouz J.

Network Function Virtualization (NFV) is a novel paradigm allowing flexible and scalable implementation of network services on cloud infrastructure. An important enabler for the NFV paradigm is software switching, which needs to satisfy rigid network requirements such as high throughput and low latency. Despite recent research activities in the field ...

May 08, 2017

Coexistence-aware dynamic channel allocation for 3.5 GHz shared spectrum systems

The paradigm of shared spectrum allows secondary devices to opportunistically access spectrum bands underutilized by primary owners. As the first step, the FCC targeted sharing the 3.5 GHz (3550–3700 MHz) federal spectrum with commercial systems. The proposed rules require a Spectrum Access System to implement a three-tiered spectrum management framework, ...